Saruni in the Media

Nomad Magazine, Kenya

By | Saruni In the Media

June 2019

Tracking black rhinos on foot in Sera Conservancy is a unique and thrilling experience that allows wildlife lovers to contribute to the protection of these critically endangered species. This is said to be the first time black rhinos are back in their habitat in the north after 30 years following a translocation, with a population of at least 13. One is almost guaranteed a sighting,…

Style Master, Taiwan

By | Saruni In the Media

June 2019

十十肯亞航空一大清早到了奈洛比,走出機場外,氣溫涼爽舒適跟我亼心中的非洲有點不同,總覺得非洲應該是熱到土地裂開,動物口站在地上,腳要一直翹起來才不至於被燙傷,這樣的氣溫真的是旅遊的好伴侶,導遊今天的工作是把我送到國內線機場,再轉搭飛機到 Maasai Mara自然保護區,進行一場可能是我觀看野生動物或是我被獅子吃掉的旅程,國內線的飛機有些規定你可能要先知道,他們是不准硬殼行李箱上飛機的,不管你的行李箱是德國百年品牌Rimowa ,或是購物台昨天才剛發明,卻說有六百年歷史的,…

Daily Nation, Kenya,

By | Saruni In the Media

7th April 2019

We woke to the roar of a lion. Well, my wife did. When I eventually opened my eyes, she told me she was sure it was a lion. Maybe it was, because on a game drive the previous evening, we saw a lioness leaving the waterhole way down on the plain below our villa.

We were at Saruni Samburu, which has the most dramatic location of any lodge I have ever stayed in. It’s like an eagle’s eyrie…  Read the article

PAA Magazine, In-flight magazine of Precision Air, Tanzania

By | Saruni In the Media

January – March 2019

Cecilia Rono has become the first female lodge manager in her own community, running the boutique Saruni Mara. In 2007, when Cecilia Rono began working as a house-keeper at Saruni Mara, the management knew they had a star in the making. And so it has proved. She now runs the boutique lodge, making her the first female general manager of a luxury safari property in the Masai Mara and possibly in Kenya. That she runs Saruni Mara, nestled in a secluded…

Elite Traveler Magazine

By | Saruni In the Media

March 2019

With only six eco-villas on the property, Saruni Samburu is a private oasis with exclusive access to over 200,000 acres of Kenyan wilderness (in fact, you won’t find another property for miles). It’s located just north of the Samburu National Reserve and has spectacular views of Mount Kenya and the private wildlife sanctuary, Kalama Community Conservancy.

MOJEH Magazine, Dubai.

By | Saruni In the Media

20th January 2019

The skies open, thunder ferociously roars in the distance and lighting strikes across the otherwise ink-black horizon. Until barely five minutes ago, the sky was a black mass punctuated only by the intense shine of its stars. Having traveled from a polluted Dubai, it’s a rare and exciting treat.

But we’re in Northern Kenya now, and this is only a whisper of the natural splendor that’s about to unfurl.  Read the article

Business Daily Africa

By | Saruni In the Media

12th October 2018

Tracking mountain gorillas in Rwanda, Uganda and Congo has been talked about world over, but few know about following black rhinos in Samburu’s Sera Wildlife Conservancy in Kenya.

At the community-owned Sera Conservancy, we started the unique and thrilling journey of tracking rhinos at 6am because the animals generally sleep during the day to escape the scorching heat.  Read the article

Glint Magazine, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

31st August 2018

A new lodge in the wild Sera conservancy in Northern Kenya has unveiled the first black rhino tracking on foot safari in East Africa, combining GPS positioning and traditional bushcraft. Lydia Bell reports for Glint Perspectives

My Samburu guide, Joseph Lekalaile, who has been tracking wild animals in the bush since he was eight years old, and is as sharp as a razor, issues a concise stream of instructions: “The black rhino are about 200 or 300 metres from here,” he says.  Read the article

The Telegraph, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

7th August 2018

We have to stay downwind of her,” our guide, Sambara Lengamuya, whispered, releasing puffs of chalk into the air like a priest dispensing incense, then watching which way the powder blew across the thorny scrubland of Sera Wildlife Conservancy in northern Read the article.

Nomad Magazine

By | Saruni In the Media

August 2018

The ranger comes to a halt and lifts the GPS transmitter a little above his head, and we all listen with bated breath for a signal being sent from the microchip implanted in the horn of the black rhino we have been tracking for the past half hour. Joseph- our Samburu guide- shakes a small cloth dispersing ash particles into the air, a method that was traditionally used in the bush to tell wind direction in order to keep one’s natural scent away from the rhino’s strong olfactory sense.

National Geographic

By | Home Page Featured, Saruni In the Media

March 2018

We crept through arid bushland, pushing aside prickly commiphora bushes and avoiding the sandy soil that crunched noisily underfoot. When we were 30 meters away from a creature that has lived on earth for 50 million years, we stopped. A sandgrouse erupted noisily from a whistling thorn tree and Loicharu’s feathered ears twitched, rotated and twitched again. Read the article

Spear’s Magazine – UK

By | Saruni In the Media

February 2018

It’s surprising how loudly your heart appears to thump in your chest when your survival depends on silence. Treading stealthily through sun-scorched scrub in the Sera Conservancy in northern Kenya, I’m conscious of every quickening beat, and flinch at each clumsy crunch, as parched branches and leaves underfoot betray me. A few paces ahead my Samburu guide, Sammy Lemiruni, is shaking an incongruous, ash-filled knotted sock to reveal the direction of the wind, and soundlessly signalling directions: walk in single file; stay quiet; crouch behind a tree and then, with considerably more resolve: Do. Not. Move.

Financial Times Online – How to Spend It

By | Saruni In the Media

 4th February 2018

The black rhino has been hunted to near extinction, with only 5,000-5,400 now left in the wild. Recent conservation initiatives have seen numbers inch upwards, but the future of the species still hangs in the balance. In 2015, in northern Kenya, the Sera Rhino Sanctuary opened as the first community conservancy in east Africa dedicated to the protection of the black rhino. Read the article

Xpose IE – Ireland

By | Saruni In the Media

24th January 2018

A quiet corner of northern Kenya offers East Africa’s first black rhino tracking experience. Sarah Marshall visits the pioneering community-owned project and goes in search of one of the world’s most endangered species. Crushing my body tightly against a boulder, I’m frightened to even breathe. Like the final moments in a thrilling blockbuster shoot out, I know at some point I’ll have to move; the question is not if, but when. Read the article 

WILK Magazine, Kenya

By | Saruni In the Media

January 2018

Some ideas turn out to be genuinely good. Others sound good, but turn out to be questionable when put into action. As one-and-a-half tonnes of a notoriously bad tempered beast with a sharply pointy front-end stared me down from a few metres away, I wondered if this idea was going to be one of the latter.

Conde Nast – House & Garden Destinations, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

January 2018

The belly of our plane grazes the dry bed of Ewaso Nyiro River, scattering vervet monkeys in its wake. For me, nothing beats the exhilarating, yes-to-life high of flying over sub-Saharan Africa in a private plane. But this blows your average airstrip-to-airstrip transfer out of the water. It’s about as much fun as you can have wearing a seatbelt.

Travel Pulse, US

By | Saruni In the Media

1st December 2017

There are many ways to get involved in the effort to save rhinos from extinction. One can donate to organizations working to protect them from poaching (such as the World Wildlife Fund), refuse to buy rhino horn products and help raise awareness about their battle for survival by spreading the word on social media and other platforms. Read the article

Business Daily, Kenya

By | Saruni In the Media

30th November 2017

The festive season is here! And rather than fly out of the country, plan to dine in the bush amid the trumpets of elephants and bleats of giraffes at the Maasai Mara game reserve. With more than 100 camps and lodges, the destination has morphed into an astounding natural beauty, but it can also be crowded and some tented camps lack privacy. Read the article

Lonely Planet, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

29th November 2017

Animal lovers who want to get up close and personal with the endangered black rhino now have the opportunity with this new walking safari experience that also encourages conservation in the local community. Saruni Rhino offers people a chance to track the black rhino on foot with the help of local expert guides and rangers. They use a combination of traditional Samburu tracking techniques and technology. Each of the 11 black rhinos in the conservancy have microchips inserted into their horns, meaning guests should be able to get within metres of the animals. Read the article

The Independent online, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

28th November 2017

Samburu warrior Sammy Lemiruni is almost certain the black rhino won’t charge. As we prepare to tiptoe through the dense Kenyan bush, the warrior-turned-ranger looks at me. “Don’t be afraid,” he whispers. It’s easier said than done. The black rhino, capable of weighing 1,400kg and standing taller than a six-foot man, is a formidable creature. Its two horns can span five feet. While it can’t see very well, it has a strong sense of smell and incredible hearing. And despite its looming bulk, the massive animal can charge at a speed of 55km per hour. Read the article

The Standard, Kenya

By | Saruni In the Media

22nd October 2017

I recently had a bit of free time on my hands and decided to head over to Samburu East District. I had been mulling over the trip to Sera Community Conservancy for a while and when time and opportunity came, I was set for it. I had been told that it was a beautiful place of solitude where you got to explore Kenya’s best bounty in nature while offering true relaxation. And I did really need to get out of town for some rest and recreation. If you have plenty of time, I recommend the six-hour long scenic road trip through Nanyuki and Isiolo towns and Archer’s Post hamlet.

Travel Africa Magazine

By | Saruni In the Media

October 2017

Late on a Sunday afternoon, we are creeping through the wilderness, tiptoeing past gnarled trees and over crunchy twigs to the harmonic bleep of a tracking device. Hawks circle overhead, screeching a terrible call, and in the distance towering mountains are silhouetted against the ebbing sun. In line we sneak: first our guide Sammy, then Lekanaya the tracker, his assistant, me, and at the back our armed ranger Jimmy.

Breathe Magazine, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

October 2017

Nothing reconnects a person to who they are like the wilderness. Raw beauty and timeless landscapes bring perspective and strip bare, helping you to face not only the harsh realities of life, but of your very core. Isolation, silence, strength, resolve – all that’s been lost waits to be rediscovered in the wildest places. Time spent with some of the world’s iconic creatures is grounding and humbling, too. Animals like the mighty rhino, for instance, have roamed the Earth for millions of years under an eternity of stars – a reminder to embrace the time you have by loving the life you live.

Travel Africa Magazine

By | Saruni In the Media

October 2017

We walk in silence for an hour, every snap or crunch of Africa’s sun-scorched bush ricocheting through the burning air like a gunshot. Sound and smell could betray us here, in this vast expanse of the Sera Conservancy in northern Kenya, and while I keep my eyes to the ground, dodging branches and side-stepping leaves, my Samburu guide Sammy is watching the wind. Shaking a sock, a wisp of ash floats south before he signals me to move on, slow, silent, single file, and then: Do. Not. Move. A thorn-laden acacia, just 20m ahead, begins to shake violently. The perpetrator is hidden, but undoubtedly huge.

BBC, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

5th October 2017

Josephine Ekiru is not nostalgic for the past. Growing up in northern Kenya in an impoverished home, she was surrounded by violence and loss. People regularly killed the wildlife she loved, and they killed each other. Tribal clashes stoked by resource scarcity and decades-long vendettas were the norm. “The only thing I was seeing was death,” Ekiru recalls. “I grew up thinking, ‘One day, I’ll tell my people that conflict is not good, that it only takes us in a circle of poverty.’” Luckily in 2011, when Ekiru was 24 years old, she discovered the Northern Rangelands Trust (NRT), an organisation composed of community conservancies in Kenya.

BBC Wildlife Magazine, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

September 2017

A wind is blowing from the east, sending dust devils spinning across northern Kenya’s plains as our Samburu warrior guide, Sammy Lemiruni, explains how to track black rhino on foot. We must walk silently in single file and obey his hand signals. We are in Samburu, en route to the 120km squared Sera Rhino Sanctuary which, in February this year, became the first community-owned sanctuary in East Africa to offer a pioneering rhino-tracking safari to tourists. I am one of the first guests.

The Straits Times, Singapore

By | Saruni In the Media

20th August 2017

Though owned by an Italian conservationist and writer named Riccardo Orizio, the lodge is staffed entirely by Samburu warriors and tribesmen, seven in all, and they are as open and friendly as you could wish. Indeed, to stay at the Saruni Rhino lodge is to undergo a total immersion course in a tribe every bit as proud and colourful as Kenya’s better-known Maasai. Read the article

Bespoke Magazine, UAE

By | Saruni In the Media

3rd August 2017

If you want to get up close and personal with some of the mere 5,000 remaining black rhinos in Africa – one of the world’s most critically endangered species – then there’s no better place than Kenya’s fenced-off 54,000-hectare Saruni Rhino. Once there, you’ll need three things: an off-road vehicle to help you get around this park, which is five times larger than Paris; a GPS locator that picks up the signals of the microchips placed in the protected rhino’s horns; and a sock filled with ash for knowing the direction in which the breeze is blowing. Plus, while we’re at it, you’d best not forget the golden rule of tracking rhinos: always stay down wind.

Nomad Magazine, Kenya

By | Saruni In the Media

August 2017

This is a lovely property in the hills with themed rooms with private decks. The Observatory cottage, for instance, sports a vintage brass telescope and moon map; the artists’ cottage a painting on an easel and paintbrushes, and the photography cottage … well, you get the picture. For honeymooners, there’s the Love Shack, a secluded cottage furnished in classic style. Read the article

The Times, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

July 2017

My ultra-luxe abode at Saruni Samburu may be a bricks-and-mortar affair, but it is so open to the panorama below as to feel like a castle in the air. (The Italian cuisine here is also excellent.) The quirky wooden structures at Elephant Watch, with their generous terraces, are charmingly Admirable Crichton affairs, the delicious food Ottolenghi-inspired.

Forbes, USA

By | Saruni In the Media

21st July

The Kalama Airstrip in the Samburu National Reserve in Kenya stretches out and disappears into the Kalama Community Conservancy, a core conservation area in North-Central Kenya that’s 46,100 hectares in size. Apart from a small one-room bungalow, Acacia trees populate the entire view for as far as you can see. If you were to trek further into the horizon, the elephant, leopard, giraffe, zebras, wild dog, cheetah and lesser kudu that populate the area are likely to be seen. Read the article

Vacations & Travel, Australia

By | Saruni In the Media

July 2017

For accommodation with a difference in Africa, it is hard to go past Saruni Samburu in Kenya. Saruni consists of just six luxurious, eco-friendly villas that overlook the Kalama Conservancy and Mount Kenya, with the villas being part of the landscape in remarkable ways. Samburu is the only lodge in over 80,937 hectares of wilderness flooded with wildlife, and from your villa designed around the rocks you will feel like the Lion King watching over your kingdom.

Travel Africa

By | Saruni In the Media

July 2017

You are always told to stay in your vehicle on safari because the animals just see the car. Outside it, they view you as an individual. So, there we were walking with rhino in the Sera Wildlife Conservancy – and my immediate thought was: “Christ, we’re not supposed to be doing this!” At one point, we were surrounded, and one of them got very heated, but the only thing we could do was stay completely still. It was an incredible experience. Read the article

National Geographic Traveller

By | Saruni In the Media

June 2017

Saruni Rhino, Sera Wildlife Conservancy’s first eco-lodge, stands six miles outside the rhino sanctuary. Tiny and blissfully intimate, it’s the only accommodation for miles. My open-fronted banda of local stone, thatch and foraged timber looks out onto dry, sandy riverbed etched with wildlife tracks and shaded by monumental doum palms with long, shaggy fronds that swish gently in the breeze.

Business Daily, Kenya

By | Saruni In the Media

June 2017

Luxury treehouses, under suites, cosy safari camps made out of wood, grass and stone show what architects can dream up as they design the cream of the accommodation crop where travellers love to escape to and relax. These hotels with experimental architecture and exquisite ambience competed in the coveted Sleep Awards organised by NatGeo Traveller and Saruni Rhino in Samburu was among the top 10. Read the article

Big Sleep Awards, National Geographic Traveller Magazine

By | Saruni In the Media

‘Green Goddess’ Award Winner – Saruni Rhino
Big Sleep Awards, National Geographic Traveller Magazine
June 2017

Saruni Rhino is the basecamp for Sera Rhino Sanctuary, which is owned by the local community and is the only place in East Africa where you can track black rhinos on foot. It benefits not just the sanctuary’s population of rhinos and elephants, but also the local
community which receives 40% of its revenue, and provides all the sanctuary’s excellent staff.

Daily Mail Online, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

6th May 2017

I am flying north from Lewa with Ian Craig in his tiny Piper Super Cub. We are buffeted by strong winds as we circle over a remote safari camp called Saruni, but Craig is known as a superb pilot, so the sudden twitches and bumps as we land on the camp’s dirt landing strip do not concern me. Read the article

The Irish Independent, Ireland

By | Saruni In the Media

30th April 2017

A large part of this conservancy is rented by the Saruni, the resort company, and is reserved exclusively for wildlife. This mutually beneficial relationship is helping to guarantee the survival and sustainability of the wildlife, and illustrates how direct the connection between tourism and conservation can be. The location of the lodge is extremely remote, and involves a hair-raising journey along narrow dirt roads. Read the article

Fabric Magazine, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

April 2017

If you’re a wildlife lover, tracking one of the world’s most endangered species on foot must surely come near the top of your bucket list. And now you can tick it off, with a Saruni Rhino walking safari. Tireless work by the Northern Rangelands Trust, in partnership with Kenya Wildlife Service, led to the creation of the Sera Community Conservancy and the return of the black rhino to Samburu warrior lands. Read the article

TTG Luxury, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

April 2017

Imagine a wildlife reserve in the Big North of Kenya. Picture ofme of the most inspiring landscapes you can imagine, 350,000 hectares large – more than Malta, Andorra, Liechtenstein and Luxembourg put together. Inside it, imagine a fenced sanctuary of 54,000 hectares larger than Isle of Man and with one of the longest electrical fences ever built in East Africa. Read the article

Lonely Planet Traveller, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

March 2017

A luxury camp opening this month in central Kenya will be the first in East Africa to offer on-foot tracking of the endangered black rhino. The animals are returning to the area after a 30-year absence, thanks to relocation efforts by conservationists and the local Samburu people, so guests at Saruni Rhino will get a first-hand perspective on a rare wildlife good news story, as well as contributing to the species’ preservation.

The City Magazine, London

By | Saruni In the Media

March 2017

In 1970, after decades of poaching, the number of black rhino grazing the planet’s grasslands had fallen to 70,000. By 1993, that figure had dropped to 2,475. Thanks to international efforts, and the first ever black rhino safari project in Kenya, numbers are on the rise.

Financial Times Online, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

March 2017

Our guide, a Samburu warrior named Joseph Lekalaile, stands on top of a smooth, rocky outcrop with two uniformed rangers, one of whom is holding up an aerial. Beyond them, beneath a huge blue African sky, an epic landscape of red earth and parched bush dotted with distant domeshaped mountains unspools to a horizon as wide as an ocean. They are searching for rhinos — black rhinos with microchips implanted in their horns, the first rhinos to be resettled in this vast and remote expanse of northern Kenya since they were hunted and poached almost to extinction here in the 1980s.