Saruni in the Media

Ugandan Airlines Magazine, Uganda

Oct – Dec 2019

Loretu Lesamana squats on the trail, casting a practised eye over what I’ve come to think of as ‘the morning newspaper’. The print he’s scanning doesn’t follow neat lines of black ink however. The thick bangles on the Samburu warrior’s forearm clatter as his fingers trace a jumble of sandy scrawls. His brow furrows as…

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Grazia, Middle East

July 2019

Nothing could be more spectacularly safari. Motoring through a majestic landscape of rich greens, wild mountains and then moving in to dense, rustic, brown forestry until you arrive at the Saruni Samburu lodge in Northern Kenya. A tiny cluster of tented luxury villas sit perched atop a mountain offering intoxicating views of Kalama Community Wildlife Conservancy, which borders Samburu National Reserve.  Saruni,…  Read the article

Nomad Magazine, Kenya

June 2019

Tracking black rhinos on foot in Sera Conservancy is a unique and thrilling experience that allows wildlife lovers to contribute to the protection of these critically endangered species. This is said to be the first time black rhinos are back in their habitat in the north after 30 years following a translocation, with a population of at least 13. One is almost guaranteed a sighting,…

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Style Master, Taiwan

June 2019

十十肯亞航空一大清早到了奈洛比,走出機場外,氣溫涼爽舒適跟我亼心中的非洲有點不同,總覺得非洲應該是熱到土地裂開,動物口站在地上,腳要一直翹起來才不至於被燙傷,這樣的氣溫真的是旅遊的好伴侶,導遊今天的工作是把我送到國內線機場,再轉搭飛機到 Maasai Mara自然保護區,進行一場可能是我觀看野生動物或是我被獅子吃掉的旅程,國內線的飛機有些規定你可能要先知道,他們是不准硬殼行李箱上飛機的,不管你的行李箱是德國百年品牌Rimowa ,或是購物台昨天才剛發明,卻說有六百年歷史的,…

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Daily Nation, Kenya,

7th April 2019

We woke to the roar of a lion. Well, my wife did. When I eventually opened my eyes, she told me she was sure it was a lion. Maybe it was, because on a game drive the previous evening, we saw a lioness leaving the waterhole way down on the plain below our villa.

We were at Saruni Samburu, which has the most dramatic location of any lodge I have ever stayed in. It’s like an eagle’s eyrie…  Read the article

PAA Magazine, In-flight magazine of Precision Air, Tanzania

January – March 2019

Cecilia Rono has become the first female lodge manager in her own community, running the boutique Saruni Mara. In 2007, when Cecilia Rono began working as a house-keeper at Saruni Mara, the management knew they had a star in the making. And so it has proved. She now runs the boutique lodge, making her the first female general manager of a luxury safari property in the Masai Mara and possibly in Kenya. That she runs Saruni Mara, nestled in a secluded…

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Why I Love Kenya Magazine, Kenya

March 2019

For the ultimate in honeymoon suites why not head for Saruni Samburu where the recently refurbished honeymoon villa not only delivers soul-stirring views over the exquisite Kalama Conservancy but also features its very own ‘wrap around’ living rock formation.

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Elite Traveler Magazine

March 2019

With only six eco-villas on the property, Saruni Samburu is a private oasis with exclusive access to over 200,000 acres of Kenyan wilderness (in fact, you won’t find another property for miles). It’s located just north of the Samburu National Reserve and has spectacular views of Mount Kenya and the private wildlife sanctuary, Kalama Community Conservancy.

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MOJEH Magazine, Dubai.

20th January 2019

The skies open, thunder ferociously roars in the distance and lighting strikes across the otherwise ink-black horizon. Until barely five minutes ago, the sky was a black mass punctuated only by the intense shine of its stars. Having traveled from a polluted Dubai, it’s a rare and exciting treat.

But we’re in Northern Kenya now, and this is only a whisper of the natural splendor that’s about to unfurl.  Read the article

Business Daily Africa

12th October 2018

Tracking mountain gorillas in Rwanda, Uganda and Congo has been talked about world over, but few know about following black rhinos in Samburu’s Sera Wildlife Conservancy in Kenya.

At the community-owned Sera Conservancy, we started the unique and thrilling journey of tracking rhinos at 6am because the animals generally sleep during the day to escape the scorching heat.  Read the article

Travel Africa Magazine, UK

July – September 2018

Secrets of the bush.
Some of Africa’s top guides reveal some of the most intriguing flora and fauna you might encounter on a walking safari – and what makes them so mesmerizing.

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The Telegraph, UK

7th August 2018

We have to stay downwind of her,” our guide, Sambara Lengamuya, whispered, releasing puffs of chalk into the air like a priest dispensing incense, then watching which way the powder blew across the thorny scrubland of Sera Wildlife Conservancy in northern Read the article.

Nomad Magazine

August 2018

The ranger comes to a halt and lifts the GPS transmitter a little above his head, and we all listen with bated breath for a signal being sent from the microchip implanted in the horn of the black rhino we have been tracking for the past half hour. Joseph- our Samburu guide- shakes a small cloth dispersing ash particles into the air, a method that was traditionally used in the bush to tell wind direction in order to keep one’s natural scent away from the rhino’s strong olfactory sense.

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SafariLink Onboard Magazine

April 2018

Two wildlife sanctuaries to watch out for in Northern Kenya. Reteti Elephant Sanctuary is the first community-owned elephant orphanage in Africa. It’s also the first time the communities of the area, traditionally nomadic pastoralists, have come together to protect their wildlife.

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National Geographic

March 2018

We crept through arid bushland, pushing aside prickly commiphora bushes and avoiding the sandy soil that crunched noisily underfoot. When we were 30 meters away from a creature that has lived on earth for 50 million years, we stopped. A sandgrouse erupted noisily from a whistling thorn tree and Loicharu’s feathered ears twitched, rotated and twitched again. Read the article

Spear’s Magazine – UK

February 2018

It’s surprising how loudly your heart appears to thump in your chest when your survival depends on silence. Treading stealthily through sun-scorched scrub in the Sera Conservancy in northern Kenya, I’m conscious of every quickening beat, and flinch at each clumsy crunch, as parched branches and leaves underfoot betray me. A few paces ahead my Samburu guide, Sammy Lemiruni, is shaking an incongruous, ash-filled knotted sock to reveal the direction of the wind, and soundlessly signalling directions: walk in single file; stay quiet; crouch behind a tree and then, with considerably more resolve: Do. Not. Move.

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Financial Times Online – How to Spend It

February 2018

The black rhino has been hunted to near extinction, with only 5,000-5,400 now left in the wild. Recent conservation initiatives have seen numbers inch upwards, but the future of the species still hangs in the balance. In 2015, in northern Kenya, the Sera Rhino Sanctuary opened as the first community conservancy in east Africa dedicated to the protection of the black rhino. Read the article

Xpose IE – Ireland

February 2018

A quiet corner of northern Kenya offers East Africa’s first black rhino tracking experience. Sarah Marshall visits the pioneering community-owned project and goes in search of one of the world’s most endangered species. Crushing my body tightly against a boulder, I’m frightened to even breathe. Like the final moments in a thrilling blockbuster shoot out, I know at some point I’ll have to move; the question is not if, but when.

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WILK Magazine, Kenya

January 2018

Some ideas turn out to be genuinely good. Others sound good, but turn out to be questionable when put into action. As one-and-a-half tonnes of a notoriously bad tempered beast with a sharply pointy front-end stared me down from a few metres away, I wondered if this idea was going to be one of the latter.

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Conde Nast – House & Garden Destinations, UK

January 2018

The belly of our plane grazes the dry bed of Ewaso Nyiro River, scattering vervet monkeys in its wake. For me, nothing beats the exhilarating, yes-to-life high of flying over sub-Saharan Africa in a private plane. But this blows your average airstrip-to-airstrip transfer out of the water. It’s about as much fun as you can have wearing a seatbelt.

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Travel Pulse, US

1st December 2017

There are many ways to get involved in the effort to save rhinos from extinction. One can donate to organizations working to protect them from poaching (such as the World Wildlife Fund), refuse to buy rhino horn products and help raise awareness about their battle for survival by spreading the word on social media and other platforms. Read the article

Business Daily, Kenya

30th November 2017

The festive season is here! And rather than fly out of the country, plan to dine in the bush amid the trumpets of elephants and bleats of giraffes at the Maasai Mara game reserve. With more than 100 camps and lodges, the destination has morphed into an astounding natural beauty, but it can also be crowded and some tented camps lack privacy. Read the article

Lonely Planet, UK

29th November 2017

Animal lovers who want to get up close and personal with the endangered black rhino now have the opportunity with this new walking safari experience that also encourages conservation in the local community. Saruni Rhino offers people a chance to track the black rhino on foot with the help of local expert guides and rangers. They use a combination of traditional Samburu tracking techniques and technology. Each of the 11 black rhinos in the conservancy have microchips inserted into their horns, meaning guests should be able to get within metres of the animals. Read the article

The Standard, Kenya

22nd October 2017

I recently had a bit of free time on my hands and decided to head over to Samburu East District. I had been mulling over the trip to Sera Community Conservancy for a while and when time and opportunity came, I was set for it. I had been told that it was a beautiful place of solitude where you got to explore Kenya’s best bounty in nature while offering true relaxation. And I did really need to get out of town for some rest and recreation. If you have plenty of time, I recommend the six-hour long scenic road trip through Nanyuki and Isiolo towns and Archer’s Post hamlet.

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Travel Africa Magazine

October 2017

Late on a Sunday afternoon, we are creeping through the wilderness, tiptoeing past gnarled trees and over crunchy twigs to the harmonic bleep of a tracking device. Hawks circle overhead, screeching a terrible call, and in the distance towering mountains are silhouetted against the ebbing sun. In line we sneak: first our guide Sammy, then Lekanaya the tracker, his assistant, me, and at the back our armed ranger Jimmy.

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Breathe Magazine, UK

October 2017

Nothing reconnects a person to who they are like the wilderness. Raw beauty and timeless landscapes bring perspective and strip bare, helping you to face not only the harsh realities of life, but of your very core. Isolation, silence, strength, resolve – all that’s been lost waits to be rediscovered in the wildest places. Time spent with some of the world’s iconic creatures is grounding and humbling, too. Animals like the mighty rhino, for instance, have roamed the Earth for millions of years under an eternity of stars – a reminder to embrace the time you have by loving the life you live.

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Travel Africa Magazine

October 2017

We walk in silence for an hour, every snap or crunch of Africa’s sun-scorched bush ricocheting through the burning air like a gunshot. Sound and smell could betray us here, in this vast expanse of the Sera Conservancy in northern Kenya, and while I keep my eyes to the ground, dodging branches and side-stepping leaves, my Samburu guide Sammy is watching the wind. Shaking a sock, a wisp of ash floats south before he signals me to move on, slow, silent, single file, and then: Do. Not. Move. A thorn-laden acacia, just 20m ahead, begins to shake violently. The perpetrator is hidden, but undoubtedly huge.

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The Telegraph, UK

11th October 2017

A stay at Saruni Rhino Camp in northern Kenya, where a protection and breeding programme has been set up by the Sera Rhino Sanctuary; this is the only camp in East Africa where rhinos can be tracked. Read the article

BBC, UK

5th October 2017

Josephine Ekiru is not nostalgic for the past. Growing up in northern Kenya in an impoverished home, she was surrounded by violence and loss. People regularly killed the wildlife she loved, and they killed each other. Tribal clashes stoked by resource scarcity and decades-long vendettas were the norm. “The only thing I was seeing was death,” Ekiru recalls. “I grew up thinking, ‘One day, I’ll tell my people that conflict is not good, that it only takes us in a circle of poverty.’” Luckily in 2011, when Ekiru was 24 years old, she discovered the Northern Rangelands Trust (NRT), an organisation composed of community conservancies in Kenya.

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BBC Wildlife Magazine, UK

September 2017

A wind is blowing from the east, sending dust devils spinning across northern Kenya’s plains as our Samburu warrior guide, Sammy Lemiruni, explains how to track black rhino on foot. We must walk silently in single file and obey his hand signals. We are in Samburu, en route to the 120km squared Sera Rhino Sanctuary which, in February this year, became the first community-owned sanctuary in East Africa to offer a pioneering rhino-tracking safari to tourists. I am one of the first guests.

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The Straits Times, Singapore

20th August 2017

Though owned by an Italian conservationist and writer named Riccardo Orizio, the lodge is staffed entirely by Samburu warriors and tribesmen, seven in all, and they are as open and friendly as you could wish. Indeed, to stay at the Saruni Rhino lodge is to undergo a total immersion course in a tribe every bit as proud and colourful as Kenya’s better-known Maasai. Read the article

Bespoke Magazine, UAE

3rd August 2017

If you want to get up close and personal with some of the mere 5,000 remaining black rhinos in Africa – one of the world’s most critically endangered species – then there’s no better place than Kenya’s fenced-off 54,000-hectare Saruni Rhino. Once there, you’ll need three things: an off-road vehicle to help you get around this park, which is five times larger than Paris; a GPS locator that picks up the signals of the microchips placed in the protected rhino’s horns; and a sock filled with ash for knowing the direction in which the breeze is blowing. Plus, while we’re at it, you’d best not forget the golden rule of tracking rhinos: always stay down wind.

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Nomad Magazine, Kenya

July 2017

My ultra-luxe abode at Saruni Samburu may be a bricks-and-mortar affair, but it is so open to the panorama below as to feel like a castle in the air. (The Italian cuisine here is also excellent.) The quirky wooden structures at Elephant Watch, with their generous terraces, are charmingly Admirable Crichton affairs, the delicious food Ottolenghi-inspired.

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The Times, UK

August 2017

This is a lovely property in the hills with themed rooms with private decks. The Observatory cottage, for instance, sports a vintage brass telescope and moon map; the artists’ cottage a painting on an easel and paintbrushes, and the photography cottage … well, you get the picture. For honeymooners, there’s the Love Shack, a secluded cottage furnished in classic style. Read the article

Forbes, USA

21st July

The Kalama Airstrip in the Samburu National Reserve in Kenya stretches out and disappears into the Kalama Community Conservancy, a core conservation area in North-Central Kenya that’s 46,100 hectares in size. Apart from a small one-room bungalow, Acacia trees populate the entire view for as far as you can see. If you were to trek further into the horizon, the elephant, leopard, giraffe, zebras, wild dog, cheetah and lesser kudu that populate the area are likely to be seen. Read the article

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Vacations & Travel, Australia

July 2017

For accommodation with a difference in Africa, it is hard to go past Saruni Samburu in Kenya. Saruni consists of just six luxurious, eco-friendly villas that overlook the Kalama Conservancy and Mount Kenya, with the villas being part of the landscape in remarkable ways. Samburu is the only lodge in over 80,937 hectares of wilderness flooded with wildlife, and from your villa designed around the rocks you will feel like the Lion King watching over your kingdom.

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Travel Africa

July 2017

You are always told to stay in your vehicle on safari because the animals just see the car. Outside it, they view you as an individual. So, there we were walking with rhino in the Sera Wildlife Conservancy – and my immediate thought was: “Christ, we’re not supposed to be doing this!” At one point, we were surrounded, and one of them got very heated, but the only thing we could do was stay completely still. It was an incredible experience. Read the article

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National Geographic Traveller

June 2017

Saruni Rhino, Sera Wildlife Conservancy’s first eco-lodge, stands six miles outside the rhino sanctuary. Tiny and blissfully intimate, it’s the only accommodation for miles. My open-fronted banda of local stone, thatch and foraged timber looks out onto dry, sandy riverbed etched with wildlife tracks and shaded by monumental doum palms with long, shaggy fronds that swish gently in the breeze.

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Business Daily, Kenya

June 2017

Luxury treehouses, under suites, cosy safari camps made out of wood, grass and stone show what architects can dream up as they design the cream of the accommodation crop where travellers love to escape to and relax. These hotels with experimental architecture and exquisite ambience competed in the coveted Sleep Awards organised by NatGeo Traveller and Saruni Rhino in Samburu was among the top 10. Read the article

Big Sleep Awards, National Geographic Traveller Magazine

‘Green Goddess’ Award Winner – Saruni Rhino
Big Sleep Awards, National Geographic Traveller Magazine
June 2017

Saruni Rhino is the basecamp for Sera Rhino Sanctuary, which is owned by the local community and is the only place in East Africa where you can track black rhinos on foot. It benefits not just the sanctuary’s population of rhinos and elephants, but also the local
community which receives 40% of its revenue, and provides all the sanctuary’s excellent staff.

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Encore! Magazine, Switzerland

21st May 2017

(German version) ‘Das seltene schwarze nashorn kann man in Kenia hautnah erleben. Bei der einzigartigen tour zu fuss durch die savanne heist es: atem anhalten!’

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Encore! Magazine, Switzerland

21st May 2017

(French version) ‘Une experiénce d’approche à pied du redoubtable rhinoceros noir est désormais possible au Kenya. On reticent son souffle et on se lance dans la broussaille’.

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Daily Mail Online, UK

6th May 2017

I am flying north from Lewa with Ian Craig in his tiny Piper Super Cub. We are buffeted by strong winds as we circle over a remote safari camp called Saruni, but Craig is known as a superb pilot, so the sudden twitches and bumps as we land on the camp’s dirt landing strip do not concern me. Read the article

The Irish Independent, Ireland

30th April 2017

A large part of this conservancy is rented by the Saruni, the resort company, and is reserved exclusively for wildlife. This mutually beneficial relationship is helping to guarantee the survival and sustainability of the wildlife, and illustrates how direct the connection between tourism and conservation can be. The location of the lodge is extremely remote, and involves a hair-raising journey along narrow dirt roads. Read the article

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Fabric Magazine, UK

April 2017

If you’re a wildlife lover, tracking one of the world’s most endangered species on foot must surely come near the top of your bucket list. And now you can tick it off, with a Saruni Rhino walking safari. Tireless work by the Northern Rangelands Trust, in partnership with Kenya Wildlife Service, led to the creation of the Sera Community Conservancy and the return of the black rhino to Samburu warrior lands. Read the article

TTG Luxury, UK

April 2017

Imagine a wildlife reserve in the Big North of Kenya. Picture of the most inspiring landscapes you can imagine, 350,000 hectares large – more than Malta, Andorra, Liechtenstein and Luxembourg put together. Inside it, imagine a fenced sanctuary of 54,000 hectares larger than Isle of Man and with one of the longest electrical fences ever built in East Africa. Read the article

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Travel Africa Magazine

April 2017

What is the most exciting or scary wildlife encounter you have had? Coming across a pride of lions with cubs on foot. Lionesses with young ones can be very aggressive.

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Lonely Planet Traveller, UK

March 2017

A luxury camp opening this month in central Kenya will be the first in East Africa to offer on-foot tracking of the endangered black rhino. The animals are returning to the area after a 30-year absence, thanks to relocation efforts by conservationists and the local Samburu people, so guests at Saruni Rhino will get a first-hand perspective on a rare wildlife good news story, as well as contributing to the species’ preservation.

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The City Magazine, London

March 2017

In 1970, after decades of poaching, the number of black rhino grazing the planet’s grasslands had fallen to 70,000. By 1993, that figure had dropped to 2,475. Thanks to international efforts, and the first ever black rhino safari project in Kenya, numbers are on the rise.

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Financial Times Online, UK

March 2017

Our guide, a Samburu warrior named Joseph Lekalaile, stands on top of a smooth, rocky outcrop with two uniformed rangers, one of whom is holding up an aerial. Beyond them, beneath a huge blue African sky, an epic landscape of red earth and parched bush dotted with distant domeshaped mountains unspools to a horizon as wide as an ocean. They are searching for rhinos — black rhinos with microchips implanted in their horns, the first rhinos to be resettled in this vast and remote expanse of northern Kenya since they were hunted and poached almost to extinction here in the 1980s.

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The Telegraph’s Ultra Travel Magazine, UK

March 2017

There’s a soft rustle. In the thicket there might be the shape of a creature that weights a ton, but maybe not. Astonishingly, it’s hard to tell. But they can be as curious as us – and often give themselves away, bending and swayng to spy you through the undergrowth. You lock eyes. The pulse quickens. It’s that close. Read the article

Saturday Telegraph Magazine, UK

March 2017

There’s a soft rustle. In the thicket there might be the shape of a creature that weights a ton, but maybe not. Astonishingly, it’s hard to tell. But they can be as curious as us – and often give themselves away, bending and swayng to spy you through the undergrowth. You lock eyes. The pulse quickens. It’s that close. Read the article

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Harrods Magazine, UK

March 2017

For those who enjoyed Planet Earth II, a safari is likely to be next on the holiday hit list. Enter Saruni Rhino, in the Sera Community Conservance in northern Kenya – the first East African lodge to offer an on-foot black-rhino tracking experience. The walking safari is led by expert guides who can help give guests incredible rhino viewing and spot other wildlife, including elephants, zebras and hyenas.

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Sunday Times Travel Magazine, UK

February 2017

There are fewer than 550 black rhinos left in Kenya. But a new camp, Saruni Rhino, gets you within metres of these majestic beasts on a unique walking safari in the Sera Conservancy, where 11 protected rhinos have been re-homed.

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BA Highlife – British Airways Magazine, UK

February 2017

Saruni Rhino, the first on-foot tracking experience of black rhinos in Kenya, designed to help protect 11 endagered black rhinos in Sera Community Conservancy.

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Marylebone & Fitzrovia Magazine, UK

17th February 2017

Chances are if you’re not part of David Attenborough’s Planet Earth team you won’t have tracked black rhinos on foot. But new safari lodge Saruni Rhino is giving its guests the opportunity to walk alongside the majestic creatures. The move celebrates the return of the endangered rhinos back to the Sera Community Conservancy and marks an historic achievement for community-based conservation efforts in Kenya.

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The Telegraph, UK

13th February 2017

Saruni Rhino, which opened this month, is set in the Sera Wildlife Conservancy, which is bigger than Luxembourg. Part-funded by Tusk Trust, it is a sanctuary for 11 black rhinos you can track on foot with Samburu guides. With room for just six guests in two stone cottages under swaying palms, it’s a unique opportunity to observe one of Africa’s most endangered species in the wilds of northern Kenya. Read the article

Your Media London, UK

February 2017

For the first time ever, Rhino Tracking can be enjoyed by adventurous visitors to East Africa. Kenyan based Saruni Rhino has launched adding to the already impressive Saruni offering in the country, but this offers something a little different. You can head out from the tented camp to track these magnificent beasts on foot with the help of trained experts of course and hopefuly catch a glimpse up close.

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Aeroflot Premium On-Board Magazine, Russia

February 2017

Another, much rarer and thus more valuable type of lodge is “natural”, created and executed in strict accordance with natural balance. Such African hotels include Saruni Samburu project, located on the border of the eponymous national park in the north of Kenya on the territory of more than 200,000 acres. Six eco-chic villas of the lodge (straw roofs, elegant wooden furniture, bright carpets, carved trunks and stands), the main building, the restaurant and even the swimming pool are carved out of red cliffs.

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Wanderlust Magazine, UK

16th January 2017

To see the Great Migration across the Mara River. Between August and September, a million or so wildebeest will be taking the plunge to cross its waters – in plain view of lurking crocs. And in northern Kenya, you’ll be able to spot black rhinos in Samburu-land for the first time in 25 years, too, thanks to the opening of Saruni Rhino Camp back in February. Read the article

Business Daily, Africa

16th January 2017

To see the Great Migration across the Mara River. Between August and September, a million or so wildebeest will be taking the plunge to cross its waters – in plain view of lurking crocs. And in northern Kenya, you’ll be able to spot black rhinos in Samburu-land for the first time in 25 years, too, thanks to the opening of Saruni Rhino Camp back in February. Read the article

Daily Mail, UK

7th January 2017

Fom next month, you will be able to track Black Rhinos on foot in East Africa for the first time when Saruni Rhino safari camp opens in Northern Kenya.

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The Week, UK

January 2017

A new safari lodge is the first in East Africa to let guests track rare black rhinos on foot. The luxury safari company Saruni is inviting intrepid safari enthusiasts to track the black rhino, one of the world’s rarest animals – on foot. Pedestrian game-viewings are growing in popularity in southern Africa, but the Saruni Rhino camp is the first to offer the experience in Kenya. Read the article

Travel Africa Magazine, UK

January 2017

In Kenya, national parks are owned and managed by the government, while private conservancies are owned and managed by the communities who own the land. In the past 10 years, the ecologically more responsible and conservation-oriented segment of the Kenyan tourism industry has moved away from the parks and has identified itself with the conservancies.

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Aspire Magazine, UK

January 2017

Saruni guests will be able to track black rhinos from February, when the Kenya specialist opens teh property in February. Located in Sera Community Conservancy, the property’s walking safaris will be accompanied by a guide and a ranger.

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The Luxury Channel, UK

December 2016

With Africa’s wild animal populations being decimated, it seems unthinkable that the biggest mammals on earth could disappear. Losing such species as elephants and rhinos from Africa is a slow erosion of humanity, leaving an empty world full of people and nothing living wild. Saruni Rhino Camp has subsequently set up the first on-foot black rhino tracking experience, a vision created by conservationists Ian Craig OBE and Riccardo Orizio. Read the article.

Africa Geographic, South Africa

28th December 2016

Set to open in February 2017, Saruni Rhino promises the unique experience of tracking rhinos in the remote Sera Conservancy, Kenya. The first of its kind, the Sera Rhino Sanctuary is the result of years of hard work by Sera community members and the Northern Rangelands Trust, and has 11 rhinos translocated from the Lewa Conservancy & Nakuru National Park among other parks. Read the article

Geographical, UK

24th December 2016

As black rhinos return to an area they were once wiped out, conservationist Ian Craig is optimistic about the future for Africa’s wildlife. The Northern Rangelands Trust (NRT), a community membership organisation in Kenya, has already been touted as the model which people should be adopting worldwide in order to successfully marry the goals of conservation with those of development. Read the article

Financial Times’ How to Spend It, UK

14th November 2016

In 2015, thanks to the tireless efforts of KENYA’s Northern Rangelands Trust (www.nrt-kenya.org), the 54,000-hectare Sera Rhino Sanctuary was established on the Sera Conservancy – the first such community-owned sanctuary in the country, providing 24-hour security for 11 highly endangered black rhinos. From February, the Saruni portfolio of lodges is offering the only walking safari to track the rhino in east Africa, at new Saruni Rhino (www.sarunisamburu.com; from $630), a tiny two-banda camp two hours’ drive north of the main Saruni Samburu lodge. Guides and rangers with GPS transmitters walk guests to within metres of the animals – a once-in-a-lifetime experience made all the more singular, and poignant, by their extreme vulnerability. Read the article

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New York Times, USA

5th November 2016

Choose small hotels that are locally owned chains and large, splashy properties won’t give you a glimpse into the local culture, but staying at a small hotel owned by locals and situated in a former home, historic building or residential part of town will. Mr. Sanghrajka, for example, recently stayed at Saruni Samburu, a safari camp in northern Kenya that is owned by a couple who live onsite and hire their staff from the local Samburu tribes. Read more

Ndege News, Air Kenya In-Flight Magazine, Kenya

November 2016

Saruni Samburu can now offer guests access to an elephant proof, open ground level, professional, photographic hide situated at a waterhole. It is a unique experience for Kenya: “hiding” inside it, novice and professional photographers can photograph birds, animals and elephants from ground level. Designed with the needs of photographers in mind, buried underground, and covered with earth on three sides as well as on the roof, located a few steps from our waterhole.

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Travel Weekly, UK

26th October 2016

Saruni, the portfolio of luxury properties in Kenya, is launching what it said will be the first opportunity in east Africa to track black rhinos on foot at its new tented camp, Saruni Rhino. The camp is located in the Sera Community Conservancy, a vast wildlife reserve nearly 1,400 square miles situated in northern Kenya. Saruni Rhino will provide a walking safari experience tracking black rhino on foot, accompanied by expert Saruni guides and highly trained Sera Community Conservancy rangers. Read article

Metro, UK

24th October 2016

Conservation groups and park rangers face a relentless – and potentially deadly -battle to save these magnificent creatures from extinction. But travellers can now learn about their plight on a new walking safari that enables brave ramblers to track black rhinos on foot. Accompanied by expert guides, the once-in-a-lifetime experience is available at the newly opened Saruni Rhino camp (packages from $505, saruni.com) in the Samburu region, where the animals have been reintroduced after an absence of 25 years.

Gestalten’s ‘Africa Rising’, Germany

October 2016

Dirk Rees, friend of Saruni Photographer, has wonderful images of the Samburu community appearing in the new Gestalten coffee table book of incredible images ‘Africa Rising’. Download the images below.

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Robb Report (Turkish language), Turkey

October 2016

Saruni Mara recently featured in Turkey’s luxury publication ‘Robb Report’. Download the article (Turkish language) below.

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DWHA, UK

August 2016

Ultimately, the best way to experience the cultural heritage of the Samburu people is through staying at camps in the local area. Saruni Samburu has a great relationship with the tribes and offers opportunities to visit the communities and witness their tribal dancing. Consisting of six luxury villas and flaunting spectacular views over Kalama Conservancy and Mount Kenya, Saruni Samburu is the only lodge in over 200,000 acres of unspoiled wilderness. A truly intimate and exceptional place, Saruini Samburu is perfect for the safari honeymoon of your dreams.

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Huffington Post, USA

July 2016

You know the game drives will be exciting, but you don’t expect some of the most incredible wildlife sightings to happen while you’re taking a bath. Covered in soap, I ran naked through my open-air villa at Saruni Samburu to grab my binoculars so that I could spy on a herd of elephants, a dazzle of zebra and a tower of giraffes – from the bathtub. Read the article

Forbes’ Arrive in Style, USA

July 2016

Saruni Samburu makes Forbes #1 of #13 – Arrive in style. Your experience with the local Samburu tribe doesn’t end after you arrive, tribe members will also be your tour guides throughout your stay. Read the article

Harper’s Bazaar, Korea

July 2016

Saruni Samburu’s breathtaking infinity pool joins the ranks of international hotel beauties in this month’s edition of Korea’s Harper’s Bazaar.

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Ndege News Air Kenya Inflight Magazine, Kenya

10th June 2016

The patio of the tent at Saruni Wild is large enough to roll out a yoga mat. Tall yellow stalks sway away uninterrupted to the skyline. Red Oat Grass. The Zebra have moved on. Yesterday, these plains were zig-zagged with their black and white stripes as they frolicked amidst their grazing. Last night the hyenas were having a party, all night whoops and white, digested bone droppings may have cleared the space. It’s fresh and serenely beautiful but it’s not quiet. A breeze whooshes between flutters, chirps, buzzes and bug stridulations.

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Living Magazine, Italy

February 2016

l così detto Mal d’Africa esiste, eccome. Io neho le prove. Un viaggio in Kenya, in quello più vero e selvaggio, è un’esperienza unica. Mare e coste a parte, si trovano luoghi immersi in una natura silenziosa e pressoché inabitata, almeno umanamente parlando, cher egalano emozioni uniche ed intense. Il safari, in Kenya, è la quintessenza della scoperta. Un viaggio su strade impervie, in 4×4, con partenze all’alba, lunghi e silenti appostamenti, per ammirare la fauna selvaggia nel loro habitat naturale è un viaggio da vivere, almeno una volta nella vita. Laikipia Wildlife Conservancy, Samburu National Reserve e Shaba sono parchi.

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Il Giornale, Italy

12th January 2016

Il Kenya è mistico, selvaggio, è il paradiso dei fotografi, il Valhalla di ch sogna l’avventura in una natura incontaminata. E per i turisti è la quintessenza dell’Africa: spazi sconfinati di savana dove il tono rosso della terra si contrappone all’intenso blu del cielo. Il Kenya è, per eccellenza, la terra dei safari e un viaggio nei parchi del nord, dal Lewa Wildlife Conservancy allo Shaba fino al Samburu significa essere conquistati dai movimenti eleganti degli animali della savana, immergersi in antiche culture, abbandonarsi alla magia di spazi scontinati che toccano nel profondo e infondono un senso di armonia e di libertà.

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Die Zeit, Germany

8th October 2015

Weil ich aber ja eigentlich lernen soll, wie es ist, Krieger zu sein, und nicht den Untergang der Samburu bedauern, ziehen einige der jungen Männer an jenem Tag nicht mit der Herde, son-dern klettern in unseren Wagen. Aufgabe eins an diesem Tag: Speerwerfen. Als wir über die Asphalt-straße vom Dorf wieder zurück in den National-park zockeln, ist unser Wagen mit sieben bunt ge-kleideten, schmuckbeladenen Jungs besetzt, die alsbald zu singen anfangen. »Ein Kriegerlied«, sagt Jose und übersetzt: Wie schwer ist ein Leben ohne Wasser und Gras? Wie weit müssen wir die Herde treiben, wie tapfer muss ein Krieger sein? Wie lang sind die Nächte in der Savanne? Wie tapfer muss ein Krieger sein? Das Lied dauert eine Viertelstun-de, aber Jose will nicht mehr übersetzen, warum ein Krieger noch tapfer sein muss.

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Private Departures, South Africa

October 2015

Saruni Samburu Lodge is one of the most luxurious lodges in the country and draws increasing numbers of discerning visitors who are looking for something beyond the often crowded Big Five sightings of Kenya’s southern safari hotspots. They come north for the spectacularly arid landscapes and for the so called ‘Samburu Special Five’ – rare reticulated giraffe, beisa oryx, Grévy’s zebra, Somali ostrich, and gerenuk, the most elegant of all gazelles. Saruni’s expert trackers had shown me all of these in the last few days, along with unforgettable sightings of countless lion, three leopards and a pack of a dozen wild dogs.

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