The Independent online, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

28th November 2017

Samburu warrior Sammy Lemiruni is almost certain the black rhino won’t charge. As we prepare to tiptoe through the dense Kenyan bush, the warrior-turned-ranger looks at me. “Don’t be afraid,” he whispers. It’s easier said than done. The black rhino, capable of weighing 1,400kg and standing taller than a six-foot man, is a formidable creature. Its two horns can span five feet. While it can’t see very well, it has a strong sense of smell and incredible hearing. And despite its looming bulk, the massive animal can charge at a speed of 55km per hour. Read the article

The Standard, Kenya

By | Saruni In the Media

22nd October 2017

I recently had a bit of free time on my hands and decided to head over to Samburu East District. I had been mulling over the trip to Sera Community Conservancy for a while and when time and opportunity came, I was set for it. I had been told that it was a beautiful place of solitude where you got to explore Kenya’s best bounty in nature while offering true relaxation. And I did really need to get out of town for some rest and recreation. If you have plenty of time, I recommend the six-hour long scenic road trip through Nanyuki and Isiolo towns and Archer’s Post hamlet.

Travel Africa Magazine

By | Saruni In the Media

October 2017

Late on a Sunday afternoon, we are creeping through the wilderness, tiptoeing past gnarled trees and over crunchy twigs to the harmonic bleep of a tracking device. Hawks circle overhead, screeching a terrible call, and in the distance towering mountains are silhouetted against the ebbing sun. In line we sneak: first our guide Sammy, then Lekanaya the tracker, his assistant, me, and at the back our armed ranger Jimmy.

Breathe Magazine, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

October 2017

Nothing reconnects a person to who they are like the wilderness. Raw beauty and timeless landscapes bring perspective and strip bare, helping you to face not only the harsh realities of life, but of your very core. Isolation, silence, strength, resolve – all that’s been lost waits to be rediscovered in the wildest places. Time spent with some of the world’s iconic creatures is grounding and humbling, too. Animals like the mighty rhino, for instance, have roamed the Earth for millions of years under an eternity of stars – a reminder to embrace the time you have by loving the life you live.

Travel Africa Magazine

By | Saruni In the Media

October 2017

We walk in silence for an hour, every snap or crunch of Africa’s sun-scorched bush ricocheting through the burning air like a gunshot. Sound and smell could betray us here, in this vast expanse of the Sera Conservancy in northern Kenya, and while I keep my eyes to the ground, dodging branches and side-stepping leaves, my Samburu guide Sammy is watching the wind. Shaking a sock, a wisp of ash floats south before he signals me to move on, slow, silent, single file, and then: Do. Not. Move. A thorn-laden acacia, just 20m ahead, begins to shake violently. The perpetrator is hidden, but undoubtedly huge.

BBC, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

5th October 2017

Josephine Ekiru is not nostalgic for the past. Growing up in northern Kenya in an impoverished home, she was surrounded by violence and loss. People regularly killed the wildlife she loved, and they killed each other. Tribal clashes stoked by resource scarcity and decades-long vendettas were the norm. “The only thing I was seeing was death,” Ekiru recalls. “I grew up thinking, ‘One day, I’ll tell my people that conflict is not good, that it only takes us in a circle of poverty.’” Luckily in 2011, when Ekiru was 24 years old, she discovered the Northern Rangelands Trust (NRT), an organisation composed of community conservancies in Kenya.

BBC Wildlife Magazine, UK

By | Saruni In the Media

September 2017

A wind is blowing from the east, sending dust devils spinning across northern Kenya’s plains as our Samburu warrior guide, Sammy Lemiruni, explains how to track black rhino on foot. We must walk silently in single file and obey his hand signals. We are in Samburu, en route to the 120km squared Sera Rhino Sanctuary which, in February this year, became the first community-owned sanctuary in East Africa to offer a pioneering rhino-tracking safari to tourists. I am one of the first guests.

The Straits Times, Singapore

By | Saruni In the Media

20th August 2017

Though owned by an Italian conservationist and writer named Riccardo Orizio, the lodge is staffed entirely by Samburu warriors and tribesmen, seven in all, and they are as open and friendly as you could wish. Indeed, to stay at the Saruni Rhino lodge is to undergo a total immersion course in a tribe every bit as proud and colourful as Kenya’s better-known Maasai. Read the article

Bespoke Magazine, UAE

By | Saruni In the Media

3rd August 2017

If you want to get up close and personal with some of the mere 5,000 remaining black rhinos in Africa – one of the world’s most critically endangered species – then there’s no better place than Kenya’s fenced-off 54,000-hectare Saruni Rhino. Once there, you’ll need three things: an off-road vehicle to help you get around this park, which is five times larger than Paris; a GPS locator that picks up the signals of the microchips placed in the protected rhino’s horns; and a sock filled with ash for knowing the direction in which the breeze is blowing. Plus, while we’re at it, you’d best not forget the golden rule of tracking rhinos: always stay down wind.